Studying Public Perceptions of Evolution and Religion from a Multidisciplinary Perspective

On Monday 24th April the Centre for Science, Knowledge and Belief in Society and the team from the Science and Religion: Exploring the Spectrum project hosted a one day symposium in central Birmingham. In this video, project Principal Investigator Dr Fern Elsdon-Baker opens the symposium by introducing and contextualising the research being undertaken by the team. Continue reading Studying Public Perceptions of Evolution and Religion from a Multidisciplinary Perspective

Towards a hung parliament of science and religion: science engagement in a diverse and democratic world

As the UK heads to the polls today, with the seeming inevitability of a hung parliament, we are reminded that simple either/or binary choices are not always reflective of public perceptions, attitudes or interests. The British public is currently filing through the polling stations (or not) in what promises to be one of the most indecisive elections in a generation.

As is often the way with the big questions that matter most – about how we view the world, how we understand society and how we would like the world to be – the choices being made don’t fall into simple black and white (or indeed red and blue) categories. They tend to be more complex, so are more nuanced and varied shades of grey. In a world then that has purportedly moved past ideology and dogmatic or polarized positions, why is it that two significant aspects of our collective way of answering these big questions –  ‘science’ and ‘religion’ – are still represented in a starkly divisive and binary way. ‘Science’ and ‘religion’ are arguably two of the most important frames with which to view our world today and each to a greater or lesser degree plays an integral role in our day-to-day lives. Continue reading Towards a hung parliament of science and religion: science engagement in a diverse and democratic world